Knowledge and Power | This website is specifically concerned with knowledge and power in the pre-modern Islamic west. It is showcasing related activities of a team of researchers at the CCHS-CSIC

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“He was even more learned than I would have expected a full time specialist to be.” The illustrious Cordoban philosopher Averroes was full of praise for the erudite Almohad Sultan Abu Ya‘qub Yusuf, after they had met for the first time. Only little later, Averroes joined the scholarly circle at the Caliph’s court in Marrakesh, where he was commissioned to write commentaries on Aristotle’s works. The anecdote is only one example of the complex relation between scholarship and political power in pre-modern Islamic societies. Throughout history, we see many cases of political rulers who sought to derive legitimacy from their alliance with learned circles. Yet stressing scholarly independence was equally a topos, since mistrust could arise from even a too close relationship with powerful patrons.

This website is specifically concerned with knowledge and power in the pre-modern Islamic west. It is showcasing related activities of a team of researchers at the CCHS-CSIC. At the same time, it attempts to provide complementary information and links to relevant projects and resources for anybody interested in this topic.

ABOUT

“He was even more learned than I would have expected a full time specialist to be.” The illustrious Cordoban philosopher Averroes was full of praise for the erudite Almohad Sultan Abu Ya‘qub Yusuf, after they had met for the first time. Only little later, Averroes joined the scholarly circle at the Caliph’s court in Marrakesh, where he was commissioned to write commentaries on Aristotle’s works. The anecdote is only one example of the complex relation between scholarship and political power in pre-modern Islamic societies. Throughout history, we see many cases of political rulers who sought to derive legitimacy from their alliance with learned circles. Yet stressing scholarly independence was equally a topos, since mistrust could arise from even a too close relationship with powerful patrons.

This website is specifically concerned with knowledge and power in the pre-modern Islamic west. It is showcasing related activities of a team of researchers at the CCHS-CSIC. At the same time, it attempts to provide complementary information and links to relevant projects and resources for anybody interested in this topic.

ABOUT

“He was even more learned than I would have expected a full time specialist to be.” The illustrious Cordoban philosopher Averroes was full of praise for the erudite Almohad Sultan Abu Ya‘qub Yusuf, after they had met for the first time. Only little later, Averroes joined the scholarly circle at the Caliph’s court in Marrakesh, where he was commissioned to write commentaries on Aristotle’s works. The anecdote is only one example of the complex relation between scholarship and political power in pre-modern Islamic societies. Throughout history, we see many cases of political rulers who sought to derive legitimacy from their alliance with learned circles. Yet stressing scholarly independence was equally a topos, since mistrust could arise from even a too close relationship with powerful patrons.

This website is specifically concerned with knowledge and power in the pre-modern Islamic west. It is showcasing related activities of a team of researchers at the CCHS-CSIC. At the same time, it attempts to provide complementary information and links to relevant projects and resources for anybody interested in this topic.